City Guide: Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki is the second biggest city in Greece and a perfect mirror of the life of Greeks. The great thing is that the weather is good and warm all year round. The not so great thing is that nothing ever really works out – at least for us. However, travelling Greece is always a bit like being thrown back in time which is because of ancient relics.

There are three things that I would say are typical for Thessaloniki. First, as Thessaloniki is located at the sea, the promenade and the harbor are quite present. Moreover, one will notice quite a number of different churches throughout the city. Last but not least, Thessaloniki’s architecture deserves a special mention as this is rather historic.

Antique architecture in Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki’s history dates back to the 3rd century BC. But as a fire destroyed a big amount of its historic center, these parts were rebuilt while other are still “untouched”.

Architecture Thessaloniki

Nevertheless, what you will find throughout the city when it comes to architecture is very typical for Greece.

Historical relics in Thessaloniki

Ancient Greece and especially historical relics are very present in Thessaloniki.

Antique Thessaloniki 2

Just keep an eye out for those, they’re not too heavy to find and honestly, not to be overseen!

Churches in Thessaloniki

As religion in Greece is dominated by the Greek Orthodox Church, it does not come as a surprise that there are several churches spread throughout Thessaloniki.

Agia Sofia Church

In Thessaloniki, there are several monuments on the list of UNESCO World Heritage. One of them is Agia Sofia Church which is the oldest church of the city and a precursor of cross-domed churches.

Byzantine Church Thessaloniki

Hagios Demetrios Church Thessaloniki stems from the early Byzantine times and is thus a religious example of Byzantine architecture. However, these are just two examples of religious monuments we found in the Greek city of Thessaloniki.

Rotunda Thessaloniki

Like the Pantheon in Rome, the dome of the Rotunda had an oculus in its original structure which goes back to the 3rd century BC.

Rotunda Thessaloniki

Rotunda Thessaloniki

However, Rotunda is nowadays on the UNESCO World Heritage Site list as well. Some even claim that Rotunda is the oldest church in the world.

Citadel Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki’s city walls or citadel mainly have nostalgic purposes nowadays.

Citadel Thessaloniki

Being located up on a hill, there is also the possibility to enjoy great views of the bay and Thessaloniki in general.

Port and Promenade Thessaloniki

The port of Thessaloniki has more significance than one may think at first sight.

Harbor Thessaloniki

It is not only one of the largest seaports of Greece, but also one of the biggest in the Aegean Sea basin.

Promenade Thessaloniki

When strolling along the water on the promenade, you might be lucky and watch some ships passing by. Especially when the sun sets, this is absolutely recommendable!

White Tower Thessaloniki

On the waterfront of the city, the White Tower which is a monument and museum in Thessaloniki can be seen.

White Tower Thessaloniki 2

However, due to some historical reasons, the White Tower is the symbol of the city of Thessaloniki.

General impressions of Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki was relaxed and chaotic at the same time which is hardly to imagine or to describe. Nothing is ever on time, even though traffic is a huge rush. People tend to be temperamentally, but slow at the same time. I guess it is just the mentality of Southern European countries which can be experienced in Greece and in Thessaloniki particularly at best.

 

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