Running in Bengaluru

Running in Bengaluru

Running in Bengaluru was a truly unique experience as it’s the norm for running in Indian cities. It’s not like it would be impossible to go running in India, but the circumstances including the horrible traffic situation and the generally high temperatures make running way tougher.

Before running in Bengaluru, I already went running in Mumbai and running in the Himalayas, so already had some experience in India.

  • Distance: 6.5 kilometers
  • Jogged altitude: 45 meters
  • Calories burned: 350-400
  • Month: February
  • Weather: Sunny

Nevertheless, running in Bengaluru was a whole different experience.

Running in Bengaluru

Map of my run through Bengaluru (tracked by Runtastic)

That’s easily explained by the fact that I decided to really go running in the streets and not, as in Mumbai, on a promenade. This meant I was to face the Indian traffic!

Traffic, potholes and rubbish

The whole experience started the minute I left The Oberoi Bengaluru with pathways, which were in such a bad condition that potholes could be observed every few meters.

Running in Bengaluru

I was aware that running in Bengaluru will be a special experience

Luckily, it was still in the morning, which meant that the traffic was not that bad.

Nevertheless, it was loud and the air was relatively polluted. On my way to Ulsoor Lake, one of the few recreation areas in the city center of Bengaluru, I also stumbled upon tons of rubbish on the street and the pathways.

Running in Bengaluru

I found tons of rubbish while running in Bengaluru

Definitely not the nicest part of running in Bengaluru.

Nature, water and runners

Yet, things got better the moment I finally reached something like a park.

Running in Bengaluru

I was kind of surprised to find a park at one point

This one was relatively small and boring, but at least something.

Upon leaving, I tried to enter another park, but the only way was to climb the wall.

Running in Bengaluru

After climbing a wall I was back on a path next to the lake

Sick of the traffic, I decided to go this way, so I could run right next to the lake.

The pathway was also in quite a good condition and after some time, I even found something like a real park with trees and benches.

To my surprise, I even met one or two other runners who were doing the same crazy thing as I!

Dead end, fire and relief

Following the pathway along the water, I was hoping to reach the South side of the lake again.

Sadly, running in Bengaluru shouldn’t work out the way I liked it to.

Running in Bengaluru

There was no option to exit the park at the end of the path

Instead, the pathway was another dead end, which meant I had to run back for another two kilometers till I found an exit (the only one) of the park.

Being at a different spot than expected, I also decided to take another route back and took some side streets, which gave me some interesting views about life in Bengaluru.

Interestingly, people are even burning their rubbish below the pathways.

Running in Bengaluru

You’ll not only find lots of rubbish, but also burning rubbish in Bengaluru

Anyway, I was really happy to be back at The Oberoi Bengaluru after running in Bengaluru.

Running in Bengaluru

After a crazy run, I was quite happy to be back at The Oberoi Bengaluru

It’s definitely been an experience, but running in India is still something absolutely crazy!

 

You like this running guide? Take a look at our other “Running in …” posts!  

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2 Comments on “Running in Bengaluru

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